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English

Faculty


Igor Webb, Ph.D.

Igor Webb, PhD

Director of the MFA in Creative Writing Program
Professor

Igor Webb, director of creative writing at Adelphi, was born in Slovakia and grew up in the Inwood neighborhood of New York City. His poems have appeared in The New Yorker and Poetry (Chicago). Among his publications are Christopher Smart’s Cat (Dos Madress Press, 2018), Rereading the Nineteenth Century (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010) and the memoir Against Capitulation (Quartet Books, 1984).  His story “Reza Says,” originally published in The Hudson Review, was selected as a Distinguished Story for Best American Short Stories, 2012. His essay “Horatio Hornblower” was reprinted in Literary Awakenings: Personal Essays From The Hudson Review (2017). Igor Webb has been a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, a Leverhulme Fellow and a winner of a National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship.


Jacqueline Jones LaMon

Jacqueline Jones LaMon

Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion
Director of Student Mentoring
Associate Professor

Jacqueline Jones LaMon is the author of two poetry collections—Last Seen, a Felix Pollak Poetry Prize selection, and Gravity, U.S.A., recipient of the Quercus Review Press Poetry Series Book Award—and the novel In the Arms of One Who Loves Me. A graduate of Mount Holyoke College and UCLA School of Law, LaMon earned her M.F.A. in Creative Writing, Poetry, from Indiana University Bloomington.

LaMon’s work has appeared in a wide variety of publications, including Poetry, Ninth Letter, Mythium, Bellevue Literary Review, Callaloo and Crab Orchard Review. Noted by the NAACP in the category of Outstanding Literature, Poetry, LaMon served as president of Cave Canem Foundation, Inc., an organization committed to cultivating the artistic and professional growth of African American poets.


Katherine Hill

Katherine Hill

Assistant Professor

Katherine Hill is the author of The Violet Hour, a novel published by Scribner in 2013. With Sarah Chihaya, Merve Emre, and Jill Richards, she is co-author of The Ferrante Letters: An Experiment in Collective Criticism, which will be published by Columbia University Press in 2019. A second novel, A Short Move, is forthcoming from Ig Publishing in 2020.

Katherine’s fiction, essays, and reviews have appeared in numerous publications, including AGNI, The Believer, Bookforum, The Common, Colorado Review, The Guardian, The Literary Review, n+1, The Nation, Philadelphia Inquirer, San Francisco Chronicle, and Tin House. She is the recipient of writing fellowships from the New York Public Library, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, and the Corporation of Yaddo. An assistant editor for Barrelhouse, she also serves on organizing committees for Girls Write Now and the PEN Prison Writing Program. Follow her on Twitter at @KHill0


Anton Dudley

Anton Dudley

Associate Professor

Anton Dudley is a graduate of Vassar College and NYU/Tisch School of the Arts. Among his many plays and musical productions are Second to Nun (music by Michael Cooper; 2017, Zeiders American Dream Theater), Girlstar (2015, Signature Theater), City Of (2015, Playwrights Realm), A Dram of Drummhicit (written with Arthur Kopit; 2010, LaJolla Playhouse), Honor and the River (2009, Walnut Street Theater), Getting Home (2006, Second Stage Theater); and Slag Heap (2005, Cherry Lane Theater).

Anton Dudley was a finalist for the 2012 Lambda Literary Award in LGBT Drama for Letters to the End of the World, a three-time finalist for the Actors Theatre of Louisville/Humana Festival Heideman Award for Faith in Gods (2010), Antarctica (2009) and Davy & Stu (2001), and recipient of the Bill Foeller Fellowship at Williamstown Theater Festival (2008), the Cherry Lane Mentors Project Fellowship (2004), and the Manhattan Theater Club Fellowship & Commission (2003).


Martha Cooley

Martha Cooley

Professor

Martha Cooley is the author of two novels–The Archivist (Little Brown, 1998), a New York Times bestseller also published in a dozen foreign markets, and Thirty-Three Swoons (Little Brown, 2005), as well as a memoir-in-essays, Guesswork: A Reckoning With Loss (Catapult, 2017). A new novel will be forthcoming from Red Hen in 2021. 

With Antonio Romani, she co-translated Antonio Tabucci’s Time Ages in a Hurry (Archipelago Books, 2015). Her co-translations have appeared in such venues as Guernica, Tin House, Massachusetts Review, and Atlanta Review.

She is the winner of an O. Henry Prize for Short Fiction (2017) and was cited for a Notable essay in Best American Essays (2013). Her short fiction, essays, and co-translations have appeared in A Public Space, AGNI, The Common, LARB, the Writer’s Chronicle, and PEN America, among other journals. She was for 15 years a member of the core faculty of the Bennington Writing Seminars in Bennington, Vermont.

 
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Department of English
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